Everything We Did at EGX Rezzed 2019

our passes for EGX RezzedWe started off by picking up our press passes from the desk at the entry point to the show, a particularly special moment as myself and Lewis have been making podcasts, and attending EGX’s for those podcasts, for nearly half a decade. Walking in for the first time with press access was a very special thing, so thank you for listening and reading and helping us get these passes. Okay sappy moment over, now to the games!

We started by tracking down and immediately interviewing the wonderful people behind the Thea series, this being a long-running tradition at Games Up Podcast. Hearing about how Thea 2 is shaping up, and how far the team has come, since we last chatted to them at EGX 2018 was, as always a pleasure. Every time it makes us more and more excited for the full release of that game. From there we made our way over to the leftfield collection but not before we met this good boy, he was named Finch.

The Leftfield collection is a collection of oddities and artworks that push the boundaries of what can be considered “video games” and it never fails to delight and confuse in equal measure. At this years EGX we encountered lots of interesting games but the one I found the most engaging and surprising was The Human Vacation Bureau, which tasked you with playing through a travel booking service for your life instead of a simple holiday, the experience of playing it was a thoroughly silly and wholesome one but the story behind the game turned out to be my favourite thing about it, you’ll be able to hear that back story in the interview we publish with the developer soon.

Once we’d left the Leftfield collection it was time to walk around and explore some of the other main rooms of indie games. It was particularly easy to enjoy these walks thanks to the Pokemon GO perks that were put on in conjunction with the show (I caught a shiny Scyther!). We played loads, and we mean LOADS, of games. Everything from an intentionally glitched RPG, to one developer’s very first character platformer, which they had brought to the show to get feedback from players and devs to teach them how to better make games.

We also got to play some triple-A games whilst at the show, the highlight of which, for me, was Borderlands Game Of The Year Edition, thanks to a demo that played incredibly smoothly and looked really lovely. But with that our time at EGX had quickly come to an end. We played loads and loads of games over the weekend, met some awesome people and just generally had a wonderful time. But as our day came to an end it was time to wind down by visiting mental health charity Checkpoint and rest by their cuddly Dark Souls style bonfires before heading home.

My game of the show was Vectronom an extremely difficult and equally satisfying rhythm puzzle game with stages made out of shifting puzzles that change based on the throbbing EDM style soundtrack. As a beat progresses so will the puzzle and it’s up to you to stay with the beat to make it to the end of each stage.

Lewis, on the other hand, prefered Terrorbane which presented something unique at the show; a game where the bugs are intentional (and hilarious). Presented as a classical JRPG this game is sure to be full of surprise twists and turns. In his time spent playing it he got the feeling you could see the game represents a long love of gaming with references and easter eggs to other games new and old and it all worked together to make something that stuck with him long after his demo ended.

We got to record a number of interviews with the developers as well as a face to face podcast (something we rarely get to do) about our experience at the show and you should keep an eye out for those in the very near future.

Cameron McCulloch-Keeble

Cam fan of all things gaming, film and geekery. here on WGN Cam will focus on Overwatch and some other professional gaming leagues.